The Ideal Team Player

Business book author Patrick Lencioni recently wrote The Ideal Team Player:  How to Recognize and Cultivate The Three Essential Virtues.  I recommend it to both employers and employees.  The three virtues expounded in the book are hungry, humble and smart.  Employers look for these virtues in order to improve their business’ service delivery and client experience.   Employees will appreciate a more positive and pleasurable work experience with ideal team players.

Excerpts from the book:

Hungry – “Hungry people are always looking for more.  More things to do.  More to learn.  More responsibility … Hungry people almost never have to be pushed by a manager to work harder because they are self-motivated and diligent.  They are constantly thinking about the next step and the next opportunity.  And they loathe the idea that they might be perceived as slackers.”

Humble – “Great team players lack excessive ego or concerns about status.  They are quick to point out the contributions of others and slow to seek attention for their own.  They share credit, emphasize team over self, and define success collectively rather than individually.  It is no great surprise, then, that humility is the single greatest and most indispensable attribute of being a team player … Humility isn’t thinking less of yourself, but thinking of yourself less.”  Caution – that last sentence is not Lencioni’s; rather, he’s quoting Rick Warren.  See http://www.bloggingtheologically.com/2015/12/11/what-cs-lewis-wrote-is-better-than-what-he-didnt/

Smart:  “refers to a person’s common sense about people.  It has everything to do with the ability to be interpersonally appropriate and aware.  Smart people tend to know what is happening in a group situation and how to deal with others in the most effective way.  They ask good questions, listen to what others are saying, and stay engaged in conversations intently.”

Lencioni provides tips and lessons on how to identify and engage ideal team players.  At the end, he offers more with a website, videos, assessment tools, and finally personal assistance.  Len recommended it to me and I thank him for it.